Quick Timeline for Anti-Drag Legislation in Tennessee

If you have wondered what has been going on with the anti-drag legislation signed into law in 2023 in Tennessee, this quick timeline may help you get your bearings. This timeline is not and should be construed as legal advice. If you have questions that have an impact on a performance you are planning, consult an attorney. While the case is pending before the Court of Appeals, different law enforcement agencies and different district attorneys around the State may have differing interpretations of the scope and enforcement of the law.

For corrections to the information presented below, contact us at [email protected] .

November 9, 2022:  SB3 filed by Senator Jack Johnson.

December 7, 2022:  HB9 filed by Representative Chris Todd.

February 23, 2023:  Drag restriction bill passes the House.

March 2, 2023:  Drag restriction bill passes the Senate.

March 2, 2023:  Drag restriction bill signed by the Governor with an April 1 effective date.

March 27, 2023:  Friends of George’s in Memphis file suit in federal district court against the State over the new law.

March 31, 2023:  Federal judge in Memphis temporarily halts enforcement of SB3/HB9.

June 3, 2023:  Federal judge in Memphis rules the law is unconstitutional and enjoins enforcement in Shelby County.

June 5, 2023:  Tennessee Attorney General says the law remains in effect in Tennessee’s other 94 counties.

June 30, 2023:  Tennessee Attorney General appeals the federal district court decision.

August 30, 2023:  Blount Pride and the ACLU of TN sue to prevent enforcement of the anti-drag law.

September 1, 2023:  Federal judge blocks enforcement of the anti-drag law against Blount Pride.

November 16, 2023:  U.S. Supreme Court declines an effort by the State of Florida to reinstate enforcement of its anti-drag law.

February 1, 2024:  Parties make arguments in the TN case before the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. “No timetable was issued for a ruling on the case.”  You can listen to the arguments at this link.


Tennessee Attorney General's actions affecting LGBTQ rights

This post simply seeks to list the actions taken by the Tennessee Attorney General's Office since September 1, 2022 using his own press releases. The items below use the wording of the title connected to the press release and do not reflect the views or the interpretation of the Tennessee Equality Project.

September 12, 2022: AG Skrmetti Leads State AG Response to U.S. Department of Education's Proposed Regulations; Redefinition of "Sex"

October 3, 2022: TN Attorney General's Office Leads 20 State Coalition in Filing Comment on Proposed HHS Regulation

October 12, 2022: AG Skrmetti Leads Thirteen State Coalition Demanding U.S. Department of Justice Respect Free Speech Rights of Critics of Irreversible Pediatric Transgender Procedures

January 26, 2023: TN Attorney General's Office Responds to Federal Government Appeal of Preliminary Injunction of Title IX Overreach

February 15, 2023:  TN AG Skrmetti Joins Multistate Coalition in Support of Florida Law Preserving Girls' Sports Teams for Biological Females

March 1, 2023:  AG Skrmetti Joins Amicus Brief Urging Sixth Circuit to Protect Religious Liberty Rights, Free Speech of Louisville Wedding Photographer

March 16, 2023:  TN Attorney General Jonathan Skrmetti Joins Amicus Brief Filed with U.S. Supreme Court in Support of Fairness in Women's Sports

May 31, 2023:  TN AG Skrmetti Joins Multistate Brief in Lawsuit against Florida School District Undermining Parental Rights

June 21, 2023:  Tennessee Attorney General's Office Provides Statement Regarding VUMC Investigation

June 30, 2023:  TN AG Skrmetti Appeals the District Court Decision in Friends of George, Inc. v. Mulroy

June 30, 2023:  TN AG Skrmetti Files Motion for Emergency Stay of the Injunction in L.W., et al. v. Skrmetti, et al.

July 8, 2023:  Tennessee Attorney General Responds to Sixth Circuit's Decision in L.W. v. Skrmetti

September 28, 2023:  Tennessee Attorney General Responds to Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals Decision in L.W. v. Skrmetti

November 2, 2023:  TN AG Leads Coalition in Criticizing EEOC's Proposed Enforcement Guidance on Workplace Harassment

November 29, 2023:  Tennessee Leads Fight against HHS' Foster Care Placement Rule that Would Violate Law and Potentially Harm Children

March 11, 2024:  TN AG Skrmetti Issues Statement Raising Concerns Over Maine's Proposed Legislative Assault on Federalism

April 29, 2024:  Media Advisory:  AG Skrmetti to Hold Press Conference Tomorrow on Tennessee's Fight to Defend Title IX

April 30, 2024:  Tennessee Leads Fight to Preserve Title IX, Student Privacy, and Fairness for Women in Education

May 13, 2024:  TN AG Skrmetti Leads 18 States in Lawsuit against Federal Agency's Unlawful Attempt to Control Private Businesses

 

 

 

 


New report on book restrictions in TN highlights growing problem and solutions

Today we release a major new report on book bans and restrictions in Tennessee that highlights, not only the problem, but the ways local advocates are organizing to oppose these measures.

Prepared by TEP Knox, Anderson, and Blount Counties Chair Aly Chapman, the report can be found at this link.

Aly has performed a valuable service for the community by assembling this toolkit that can be used as cities and counties around the state face surging efforts to restrict access to books and other materials in school and public libraries. As well as providing general resources, the report looks at how advocates in Anderson, Maury, Wilson, Rutherford, and McMinn Counties are organizing against book bans and restrictions.

We consider research on the solutions to be vitally important. We are frequently confronted with the numbers and the news reports of attacks on books without getting a sense of how to address the issue. One path forward is looking at what local advocates have actually done, what they say works, and what they say that they need.

We hope that advocates around the state will use this toolkit in the months ahead to protect their libraries and the freedom of information so vital for our democracy.


Legislative report for the 2024 regular session

All bills that were introduced in the 2024 legislative session affect the LGBTQ community in some way, whether they be tax bills, gun bills, or energy bills. We have put together this list of bills that either directly target the LGBTQ community or could be used for that purpose. No list is comprehensive and definitive. We could engage in further interpretation of many other bills and find a place for them on these lists. Nevertheless, this list will give anyone interested a starting point for discovering the scope of the attacks and how we fared this year.

Bills directly attacking the LGBTQ community that passed basically as they were introduced (3)

SB2766/HB1634 by Sen. Bowling and Rep. Bulso. As introduced, revises language prohibiting educators from discriminating against students on certain, specified bases such as sexual orientation to generally prohibiting educators from discriminating against students who are members of a protected class under federal or state law; removes the definition of "gender identity" for purposes of the family life curriculum.

Commentary:  The amended bill removes not only sexual orientation from the teacher code of ethics, but it also removes federally protected classes like race, sex, and national origin. Gender identity was never part of the teacher code of ethics. One positive in the amended bill is that it did not remove gender identity from the family life curriculum.

SB1738/HB2169 by Sen. Rose and Rep. Littleton. As introduced, enacts the "Tennessee Foster and Adoptive Parent Protection Act," which prohibits the department of children's services from requiring an adoptive or foster parent to support a policy on sexual orientation or gender identity that conflicts with the parent's sincerely held religious or moral beliefs.

SB1810/HB2165 by Sen. Rose and Rep. Littleton. As introduced, requires a request made by a student to an employee of the student's LEA or public charter school for an accommodation to affirm the student's gender identity to be reported to a school administrator and to the student's parent; prohibits an employee of an LEA or public charter school from knowingly providing false or misleading information to a student's parent regarding the student's gender identity or intention to transition to a gender that differs from the student's sex at the time of birth; authorizes civil actions to be filed by parents and by the attorney general and reporter against a noncompliant LEA or public charter school. 

Commentary:  A minor and positive amendment in the bill exempts students aged 18 and above.

Bills directly attacking the LGBTQ community that passed and were heavily amended (3)

SB2782/HB2310 by Sen. Bowling and Rep. Richey. As introduced, creates a civil cause of action against any person who knowingly removes a minor from this state without the consent of a parent of the minor for the purpose of assisting the minor in obtaining a healthcare procedure that is for the purpose of enabling the minor to identify with, or live as, a purported identity inconsistent with the minor's sex or treating purported discomfort or distress from a discordance between the minor's sex and asserted identity.

Commentary: At one point the bill was amended to include criminal penalties and it did not include a provision for parents to designate someone to take their child to a medical appointment. In the final bill, the criminal penalties were removed and there is a provision for parents to designate someone to assist their child.

SB2861/HB2619 by Sen. Roberts and Rep. Ragan. As introduced, permits the department to file its annual report regarding the effectiveness of diversion of offenders from state correctional institutions electronically.  As amended, the bill prevents the state from paying for gender-affirming care for incarcerated persons

Commentary:  The bill text did not start as an anti-transgender bill, but late in the session it was amended to prevent the state from paying for gender-affirming healthcare for incarcerated persons. 

SB596/HB878 by Sen. Pody and Rep. Fritts. As introduced, states that a person is not required to solemnize a marriage if the person has an objection to solemnizing the marriage based on the person's conscience or religious beliefs.

Commentary:  The final bill was heavily amended removing the language about conscience or religious beliefs. 

Bills monitored because they may have implications for the LGBTQ community that passed (6)

SB2503/HB2610 by Sen. Stevens and Rep. Garrett. As introduced, terminates the human rights commission with no wind-down period; creates the human rights division in the office of attorney general; transfers the commission's functions to the new division.

Commentary:  This bill was heavily amended to become a study of the issue. Furthermore, since the Tennessee Human Rights Act does not include sexual orientation and gender identity, the Commission has not been empowered to be a strong forum for addressing discrimination against the LGBTQ community. The discrimination intake form for the Commission makes no mention of sexual orientation or gender identity, nor does the Commission’s 2023 annual report.

SB2501/HB2784 by Sen. Hensley and Rep. Cepicky. As introduced, establishes deadlines for public institutions of higher education to initiate and complete an investigation into a report filed by a student or employee alleging they have been penalized, discriminated against, or received adverse treatment due to their refusal to support or otherwise assent to a divisive concept, specific ideology, or political viewpoint; establishes financial penalties for institutions that fail to timely investigate such reports or fail to timely report the results of such investigations to the comptroller of the treasury; requires the comptroller to report institutions that frequently submit reports of such investigations to the education committees of the senate and house of representatives.

SB2749/HB2936 by Sen. Haile and Rep. Faison. As introduced, enacts the “Families’ Rights and Responsibilities Act."

SB1792/HB1614 by Sen. Massey and Rep. Hazlewood. As introduced, enacts the "Protect Tennessee Minors Act"; requires an individual or commercial entity that publishes or distributes in this state a website that contains a substantial portion of material harmful to minors perform reasonable age-verification methods to verify the age of individuals attempting to access the material; specifies that a violation of age-verification or data retention requirements is a Class C felony.

SB2097/HB1891 by Sen. Johnson and Rep. Lamberth. As introduced, creates the "Protecting Children from Social Media Act."

SB2767/HB2435 by Sen. Bowling/Rep. Bulso. As introduced, requires the commissioner of education to annually transmit, no later than October 1 of each year, filings submitted to the commissioner by a local board of education regarding any action or inaction taken by the board in response to an investigation conducted by the director of schools in response to a complaint filed by a parent or legal guardian of a student who received instruction in family life that the parent or legal guardian believes to violate the requirements for such instruction to the chairs of the education committees of the senate and house of representatives. 

Bills attacking the LGBTQ community that failed (16)

SB1722/HB1605 by Sen. Hensley and Rep. Bulso. The official summary notes, "As introduced, prohibits LEAs and public charter schools from displaying in public schools flags other than the official United States flag and the official Tennessee state flag."

SB1858/HB1632 by Sen. Haile and Rep. Bulso. As introduced, gives a parent of a child who attends, or who is eligible to attend, a school operated by a local education agency or a public charter school standing to file a civil action against the LEA or public charter school in a chancery court of competent jurisdiction to enforce the Age-Appropriate Materials Act of 2022.

SB2351/HB1660 by Sen. Hensley and Rep. Ragan. As introduced, prohibits certain institutions of higher education from defining discriminatory practices in their antidiscrimination policies in a manner inconsistent with the definition of discriminatory practices in state law; prohibits certain institutions of higher education from establishing or recognizing forms of discrimination in their antidiscrimination policies in a manner inconsistent with the forms of discrimination recognized as legally actionable by this state; requires the Tennessee higher education commission to establish a process for persons to file a complaint alleging that an institution is not complying with such prohibitions.

SB2173/HB1661 by Sen. Hensley and Rep. Ragan. As introduced, enacts the "Restricted Access by Minors to Obscene Library Materials Act.

SB2350/HB1948 by Sen. Hensley and Rep. Ragan. As introduced, establishes various prohibitions and requirements for public institutions of higher education regarding diversity, equity, and inclusion.

SB2781/HB1949 by Sen. Bowling and Rep. Ragan. As introduced, expands the offense of observation without consent to include a person or entity that adopts rules or enforces a policy or other work-related guidance for employees or contractors to promote or assist in the commission of observation without consent in a place where there is a reasonable expectation of privacy, including a restroom, locker room, dressing room, or shower, designated for multi-person, single-sex use; creates a civil action for invasion of privacy based on a violation of observation without consent.

SB2780/HB1995 by Sen. Bowling and Rep. Ragan. As introduced, requires the department to create a separate marriage license application form and marriage license form that may be used by applicants if the bride is a female and the groom is a male; prohibits a county clerk from certifying and recording this marriage license form if the form was used to solemnize a marriage between persons other than a female bride and a male groom. 

HB1991 by Rep. Leatherwood. As introduced, establishes a complaint, hearing, and removal process for clubs and organizations available to students attending a public school.

Commentary: This bill is included because it is an attack on GSAs.

SB2107/HB2457 by Sen. Pody and Rep. Lynn. As introduced, requires the removal of sexually explicit material from the libraries of public schools; creates a process for evaluating library materials for sexually explicit material in public schools.

SB2396/HB2816 by Sen. Hensley and Rep. Faison. As introduced, requires gender clinics accepting funds from this state to perform gender transition procedures to also perform detransition procedures; requires insurance entities providing coverage of gender transition procedures to also cover detransition procedures; requires certain gender clinics and insurance entities to report information regarding detransition procedures to the department of health.

SB1339/HB1215 by Sen. Johnson and Speaker Sexton. As introduced, prohibits any managed care organization that contracts with the bureau of TennCare to provide medical assistance from providing reimbursement or coverage for a medical procedure if the performance or administration of the procedure is for the purpose of enabling a person to identify with, or live as, a purported identity inconsistent with the person's sex, or treating purported discomfort or distress from a discordance between a person's sex and asserted identity.

SB1110/HB1386 by Sen. Bowling and Rep. Ragan. As introduced, enacts the "Marital Contract at Common Law Recording Act"; authorizes county clerks to accept and record a record of common law marriage between one man and one woman; limits the jurisdiction of circuit courts and chancery courts in cases involving the definition of common law marriage to the principles of common law marriage.

SB620/HB1414 by Sen. Pody and Rep. Todd. As introduced, enacts the "Families' Rights and Responsibilities Act", which declares that the ability of a parent to direct the upbringing, education, health care, and mental health of that parent’s child is a fundamental right. Note the language on gender identity in the bill

SB1469/HB1447 by Sen. Johnson and Rep. Faison. As introduced, clarifies that prescribing hormone treatment for minors is not a standard medical practice when the treatment is for the purpose of enabling a minor to identify with, or live as, a purported identity inconsistent with the minor’s sex or treating purported discomfort or distress from a discordance between a minor's sex and asserted identity.

SB918/HB1319 by Senator Rose and Rep. Kumar. This is a caption bill with an amendment that would have the effect of restricting the display of flags such as Pride flags and Black Lives Matter flags on public buildings.

SB603/HB571 by Sen. Hensley and Rep. Carringer. As introduced, prohibits public institutions of higher education offering certain medical and health-related degree or certificate programs, and state contractors, from requiring diversity, equity, and inclusion training and education for purposes of the issuance of a degree, or the approval of a state contract or grant, as applicable. Note: It is not clear the extent to which the practice is occurring with respect to sexual orientation and gender identity in Tennessee.

Bills monitored because they may have discriminatory implications for the LGBTQ community that failed (3)

SB1643 by Sen. Pody. As introduced, requires commercial entities that publish or distribute material on an internet website, more than one-third of which is sexual material harmful to minors, to verify that an individual attempting to access the material is 18 years of age or older; prohibits a commercial entity or a third party that performs the age verification from retaining any identifying information of the individual.

SB2042/HB2160 by Sen. Rose and Rep. Barrett. As introduced, requires a commercial entity that knowingly publishes or distributes on the internet material harmful to minors to provide internet or cellular service subscribers the opportunity to request that the commercial entity block website access through the subscriber's internet or cellular service subscription.

SB138/HB761 by Sen. Hensley and Rep. Eldridge. This bill regulates phones and tablets sold in Tennessee and filtering of material deemed harmful to minors. It appears to be dealing with pornography, but it could be used to filter LGBTQ content.

 


Campaigns for week of April 22

Remember that in the last days of the legislative session the schedule is fluid. We will provide updates as they are available and as we are able to post them.

ACTION ITEMS

KEY EMAIL CAMPAIGNS

*Use the easy form at the link to tell the House Finance Subcommittee that HB2310 is too vague to adopt. HB2310 adds criminal stigma for youth gender-affirming care travel. It may also criminalize sharing of information about where families can get this medically necessary care.

*Use the easy form at the link to tell YOUR senator to vote NO on SB1722 and HB1319, two bills aimed at banning Pride flags and other flags in schools and on other public buildings.

KEY PHONE CALLS TO MAKE

*Call Governor Lee at 615-741-2001 and urge him to veto SB2766/HB1634, SB2861/HB2619, and SB1810/HB2165.

SB2766/HB1634 removes protected classes like sexual orientation, race, and national origin from the teacher code of ethics. SB2861/HB2619 removes the ability of the Department of Corrections to use state funds for gender-affirming care, and SB1810/HB2165 requires schools to out trans and non-binary students if they request an accommodation at school.

CALENDAR OF BILLS

MONDAY, APRIL 22

4:00 p.m.  Senate floor session. BILLSSB1722. Note: Deferred to Tuesday's floor session.

TUESDAY, APRIL 23

10:30 a.m. House Finance Subcommittee. BILLSHB2310.

2:00 p.m.  Senate floor session.  BILLSSB918. SB1722.


Campaigns for week of April 15

ACTION ITEMS

KEY EMAIL CAMPAIGNS

*Use the easy form at the link to tell YOUR member of the Tennessee House of Representatives to vote NO on HB2165, a bill that outs trans and non-binary students.

*Use the easy form at the link to tell the House Finance Subcommittee to ask tough questions about the definition of recruiting and whether the fiscal note is high enough for HB2310, a bill that attaches criminal penalties and stigma related to recruiting, harboring, and transporting youth for gender-affirming care contrary to the wishes of parents.

*Use the easy form at the link to tell your own senator to vote NO on the flag ban bill that is up for a vote on the Senate floor on April 17.

KEY CALL TO MAKE

*Call Governor Lee at 615-741-2001 and urge him to veto SB2766/HB1634, a bill that removes protected classes from the teacher code of ethics like race, sex, and sexual orientation and to veto SB2861/HB2619, a bill that prevents the Tennessee Department of Corrections from using state funds to provide gender-affirming care.

 

FULL CALENDAR

Events marked in blue include high priority bills.

MONDAY, APRIL 15

2:00 p.m.  House floor session in the Capitol. BILLSHB2165, HB1891.

TUESDAY, APRIL 16

2:00 p.m. House Finance Subcommittee in House Hearing Room 1. BILLSHB2310, HB1632, HB1614.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17

8:30 a.m. Senate floor session in the Capitol. BILLSSB1722. HB1319. SB1810.


Campaigns for week of April 8

ACTION ITEMS

More will be added in the coming days.

KEY PHONE CALLS TO MAKE

*Call Governor Lee at 615-741-2001 and urge him to VETO SB1738/HB2169, a bill that prevents DCS from screening out anti-LGBTQ parents from adoption and foster care.

KEY EMAIL CAMPAIGNS

*Use the easy campaign at the link to send a message to your own member of the Tennessee of House of Representatives. On Monday, the House will vote on HB1634, which erases specific LGBTQ protections for students, and HB2165, which forces school districts to out trans students when they request an accommodation like the correct pronoun or name.

FULL CALENDAR

Items marked in blue contain priority bills.

MONDAY, APRIL 8

3:00 p.m. House floor session in the Capitol. BILLSHB2165, HB1634, HB2610.

3:30 p.m. Senate floor session in the Capitol. BILLSSB2097.

TUESDAY, APRIL 9

1:30 p.m. Senate floor session in the Capitol. BILLSSB1792.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10

8:30 p.m. Senate floor session in the Capitol. BILLS:  SB2766. SB2041.

9:00 p.m. House floor session in the Capitol. BILLSHB2165.

THURSDAY, APRIL 11

8:30 a.m. Senate floor session in the Capitol. BILLSSB2782.

9:00 a.m. House floor session in the Capitol. BILLSHB2784, HB2936.


Campaigns for week of April 1

*ACTION ITEMS

More items will be added over the coming days

KEY OPPORTUNITIES TO SHOW UP

*APRIL 1 starting at 2:15 p.m.  Protest the adoption/foster care discrimination bill in the Capitol near the House Chamber. The House floor session begins at 3:00 p.m. RSVP at this event page or at the Facebook event link.

KEY EMAIL CAMPAIGNS

*NEW. Use the easy form at the link to tell your State Representative to vote NO on HB2169, the adoption/foster care discrimination bill.

*NEW. Use the easy form at the link to tell the House Education Administration Committee to vote NO on HB1634 and HB2165 that make LGBTQ students more vulnerable to discrimination and force schools to out transgender and non-binary students.

*NEW. Use the easy form at the link to tell the Senate Judiciary Committee and the House Civil Justice Committee to vote NO on SB2782/HB2310, a bill that stigmatizes travel for youth gender-affirming care with criminal and civil penalties when it is not parent-approved.

FULL CALENDAR

Events marked in blue contain priority bills

MONDAY, APRIL 1

12:30 p.m. Senate Judiciary Committee in Senate Hearing Room 1. BILLSSB2782.

1:30 p.m. Government Operations Committee in House Hearing Room 1. BILLSHB2610.

3:00 p.m. House floor in the Capitol. BILLS AND RESOLUTIONSHB2169HJR1153.

TUESDAY, APRIL 2

8:30 a.m. Senate Finance in Senate Hearing Room 1. BILLSSB1792. Note: This bill is behind the budget in the House.

11:00 a.m. House Civil Justice Committee in House Hearing Room 1. BILLSHB2936, HB1386, HB2310. Note: HB1386 has been sent to the General Subcommittee of the Senate.

1:00. Senate Judiciary Committee in Senate Hearing Room 1:  BILLS:  SB2782.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3

9:00 a.m. Criminal Justice Subcommittee in House Hearing Room 2. BILLSHB1949. Note: This bill is deferred to summer study in the Senate.

12:30 p.m. House Education Administration Committee in House Hearing Room 1. BILLSHB2165, HB1634, HB2784.

THURSDAY, APRIL 4

9:00 a.m. Senate floor session in the Senate Chamber in the Capitol. BILLSSB2767 and SB2097.

 


Campaigns for week of March 25

ACTION ITEMS

More items will be added over the coming days.

KEY EMAIL CAMPAIGNS

*Use this easy form to tell your own member of the Tennessee House of Representatives to reject HB2169, which prevents DCS from having an inclusive non-discrimination policy in adoption and foster care. The bill is on the House floor on April 1.

*NEW: Use this easy form to tell your State Senator to vote NO on SB2766, a bill that removes non-discrimination protections for LGBTQ students.

*NEW: Use this easy form to tell the Senate Judiciary Committee and the House Criminal Justice Subcommittee to vote NO on SB2781/HB1949, which is the anti-trans bathroom bill. It is up for a vote in those committees on March 26.

*NEWUse this easy form to tell the House Education Administration Committee to vote NO on HB1634 and HB2165 on March 27. These bills remove protections for LGBTQ students and force school districts to out trans and non-binary students.

KEY OPPORTUNITIES TO SHOW UP

*Save the Date. April 1 protest against the adoption/foster care discrimination bill. Learn more and RSVP at the link.

FULL CALENDAR

Events marked in blue contain high priority bills

MONDAY, MARCH 25

1:30 p.m. Government Operations in House Hearing Room 1. BILLSHB1661. This bill is deferred to summer study in the Senate.

3:00 p.m. House floor session in the Capitol. BILLSHB1891.

3:30 p.m. Senate floor session in the Capitol. BILLSSB2766.

TUESDAY, MARCH 26

Noon. House Criminal Justice Subcommittee in House Hearing Room 2. BILLSHB1949.

1:00 p.m. Senate Judiciary Committee in Senate Hearing Room 1. BILLSSB2781.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 27

10:30 a.m. House State Government Committee in House Hearing Room 1. BILLSHB2610.

10:30 a.m. House Finance Subcommittee in House Hearing Room 3. BILLSHB1614.

1:00 p.m. House Education Administration Committee in House Hearing Room 1. BILLSHB2165, HB1634, HB2784.

THURSDAY, MARCH 28

8:30 a.m. Senate floor session. BILLSSB2749, SB1858.


Campaigns for week of March 18

ACTION ITEMS

KEY OPPORTUNITIES TO SHOW UP

Tuesday, March 19 is a big day for committee hearings on discriminatory bills starting at Noon with the last committees starting at 4:30 p.m. If you want to arrive a little early, we'll be in the cafeteria of the Cordell Hull Building starting at 11:00 a.m. To learn more and RSVP, go to this event link. If you know you are going to be there and want to talk about a special assignment, email us at [email protected] .

KEY EMAIL CAMPAIGNS

*Use this easy form to tell your member of the TN House of Representatives to vote NO on HB2169, the adoption/foster care discrimination bill. It is on the House floor on March 21.

*Use this easy form to tell the members of the House Civil Justice Committee to vote NO on HB2310, the bill on criminalization stigma for travel related to gender-affirming care.

*Use this easy form to tell members of the House K-12 Subcommittee to vote NO on HB1634 that removes sexual orientation from education policy and gender identity from the family life curriculum and NO on HB2165 that forces schools to out trans and non-binary students.

*Use this easy form to tell members of the Senate Judiciary Committee and the House Criminal Justice Committee to vote NO on SB2781/HB1949, a horrible anti-transgender bathroom bill.

*Use this easy form to tell members of the House Children and Family Affairs Subcommittee to vote NO on HB1386, a bill that provides a separate marriage registration option for man/woman couples, on March 19.

*Use this easy form to tell your own state senator to vote NO on SB1738, the adoption/foster care discrimination bill. It is on the Senate floor on the morning of March 21.

FULL CALENDAR

Events marked in blue contain high priority bills.

MONDAY, MARCH 18

1:30 p.m. Government Operations. BillsHB1661.

3:00 p.m. House Higher Education Subcommittee. BillsHB2784.

4:00 p.m. House floor. BillsHB2435.

TUESDAY, MARCH 19

Noon. House Children and Family Affairs Subcommittee. BillsHB2936, HB1386.

1:00 p.m. Senate Judiciary Committee. BillsSB2781.

4:30 p.m. House Criminal Justice Committee. Bills: HB1949, HB1614.

4:30 p.m. House K-12 Subcommittee. Bills: HB1634, HB2165.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20

10:30 a.m. House State Government Committee. BillsHB2610.

Noon. House Civil Justice Committee. BillsHB2310.

2:00 p.m. Senate Education Committee. BillsSB1858, SB2501, SB2767.

THURSDAY, MARCH 21

8:30. Senate floor. BillsSB1738.

9:00. House floor. BillsHB2169.

 



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