Emerging Tennessee Slate of Hate for 2021

This is the current shape of the #SlateOfHate in Tennessee.

SB228/HB3 by Sen. Hensley and Rep. Cepicky: This bill repeats the effort to prevent transgender students from participating in high school and middle school sports. It ties a student's gender to the original birth certificate.  The "whereas" clauses attempt to pit transgender people against women's sports.  Governor Lee signed the bill after it passed both legislative chambers.

SB562/HB233 by Sen. Bowling and Rep. Leatherwood: This bill appears to be a caption bill that would eventually carry explicitly anti-marriage equality language. It pertains to marriage licensing and definitions.  The bill has not moved this session.

SB193/HB372 by Sen. Bowling and Rep. Casada:  This bill allows employees of state or local government (which also includes public universities and colleges) to skip trainings or seminars that conflict with their values or religious beliefs.  We believe that the bill provides a way of undermining LGBTQ-inclusive training sessions and seminars offered by government entities. Taken off notice on March 17.

SB1229/HB529 by Sen. Rose and Rep. Moody:  This bill would require public schools to notify parents before offering any curriculum about sexual orientation and gender identity. The bill allows parents to opt their children out of such instruction. The bill has passed the Senate and is headed to the House floor.

SB657/HB578 by Sen. Bowling and Rep. Ragan: This bill criminalizes gender-affirming care for transgender youth. Passed House Criminal Justice Subcommittee on March 17. It will be amended in the full committee to remove the criminal penalties, but no version of this bill is acceptable. Moving in House committees. The bill has not moved in the Senate and will be up in the House Health Committee on April 14.

SB1216/HB800 by Sen. Niceley and Rep. Griffey: This bill censors LGBTQ content in public school textbooks and instructional materials. It's an updated version of the old "Don't Say Gay" bill. The bill passed the House Education Instruction Committee on April 7 and is headed to House Finance. It is said that it will not move in the Senate this year. 

SB1238/HB1177 by Sen. Pody and Rep. Jerry Sexton: This legislation is an anti-transgender "bathroom" bill. The bill has not moved this year.

SB1367/HB1233 by Sen. Bell and Rep. Zachary:  Anti-transgender student bathroom bill 2.0.  The bill is up in House Finance subcommittee on April 13 and before the full Senate on April 19.

SB1224/HB1182 by Sen. Bowling and Rep. Rudd: This will requires businesses that have transgender-inclusive restrooms to post signs saying, "THIS FACILITY MAINTAINS A POLICY OF ALLOWING THE USE OF RESTROOMS BY EITHER BIOLOGICAL SEX, REGARDLESS OF THE DESIGNATION ON THE RESTROOM." That will make restrooms less safe for transgender people and it will lead to aggression against inclusive businesses.  Passed House State Government Committee with some minor amendments on March 23. The bill has passed the House and is set for the Senate Judiciary Committee on April 13.

SB126/HB1027 by Sen. Haile and Rep. Kumar:  This is a caption bill that will likely carry language regulating gender-affirming care for transgender youth. Moving in Senate and House committees.  The bill is on the Senate floor on April 8 and is set for the House Health Committee on April 14.

SB659/HB1535 by Sen. Bowling and Rep. Weaver:  This bill is a wide-ranging effort to prevent supplemental materials from being used in public school curricula. One effect would be to inhibit LGBTQ-inclusive materials.  The bill is heading to the House floor, but it won't be heard in the Senate Education Committee until next year.

SB1208 by Sen. Pody:  "As introduced, prohibits this state and any political subdivision of this state, or any official of this state or a political subdivision, from creating, enforcing, or endorsing policies that respect or promote non-secular self-asserted sex-based identity narratives, sexual orientation orthodoxy, or non-secular marriage doctrine because the policies fail the Lemon test, as established by the United States Supreme Court in Lemon v. Kurtzman, 403 U.S. 602 (1971)." Note: There is no House sponsor at this time.

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